Sign up
Exhibition January 5 − February 4
Vladimir Scherbin, exhibition of paintings and graphics
On January 5, the Mansard of Artists opens an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Vladimir Scherbin, Honored Architect of Russia, author of the new building of the Russian National Library on Moskovsky Prospekt, Moscow Hotel, Druzhba Hotel in Vyborg, several metro stations, residential buildings, memorials and many other buildings in St. Petersburg and in the post-Soviet space.
Vladimir Nikolaevich was born in 1930 in the family of a Leningrad architect. After graduation, he entered the Academy of Arts, where he studied in the studio of Eugene Levinson, who designed the House of Sovtorgoffice on Kamennoostrovsky Prospekt and Avtovo metro station. Later, Eugene Levinson invited Shcherbin to work in the workshop number 5 of LenNIIproekt. He worked there until 1996, since 1972 he directed the architectural and planning workshop No. 6, and since 1961 he taught at the Mukhinsky College and the Academy of Arts.
According to the artist, art historian and architect Valery Isachenko, the profession of an architect in post-war Leningrad was considered stable and attractive. Unlike artists, architects at that time always had work and orders that could be counted on, and many young people preferred to go this way. However, no one could be considered a good architect if he was not involved in painting, graphics or sculpture.
Vladimir Shcherbin was a wonderful painter. It was the look of a good painter and draftsman that allowed him to become not just a designer, but a talented architect, to create graphic and solid buildings that fit into the environment and captivate the eye from any point of view.
Shcherbin emphasized his belonging to the Leningrad architectural school with its attention to the environment, the desire to work with urban space as a living and whole organism. Valery Isachenko, comparing the Leningrad and Moscow schools with the Roman-Florentine and Venetian traditions, agrees with Shcherbin. Shcherbin's paintings, like his architectural projects, are intelligent, graphic and beautiful in their restraint.
Galleries at the exhibition