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$10 frame for Da Vinci: IKEA`s brilliant marketing push around the sensational sale and a false news about it.

  2 
News agencies keep spreading the materials about the sensational sale of Salvator Mundi by Leonardo da Vinci for USD 450 million, and the fake ones arise among them as well. The Onion news agency supposed that the painting was sold without a frame, and this inspired the IKEA marketing people to do something really special.
The ad about somewhat more affordable prices features the painting sold for the record price in the IKEA frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
with a $9,99 tag; and it is really hard to deny the slogan:

"When you spend $450 million on a painting,
but don`t like the frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
."

An ad with more expensive frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
appeared on the company`s Facebook page right the day after the painting had been sold at Christie`s New York:
"When you spend $450 million on a painting, and you got a a deal on a new frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
."


The background of this witty ad is the following: as The Onion told, auctioneers at Christie’s had not been totally forthright to the undisclosed buyer of $450 million Da Vinci painting Salvator Mundi handing the panel with nothing around it, though it seemed obvious that the buyer would be getting the complete package.


Merry writers concocted the interview with the alleged buyer of the painting who told reporters he was sure that the gold plated frame of this masterpiece, executed in the Renaissance style, was included in the price of the picture at least partially. "When I decided to buy a picture, it seemed obvious that I would get the full package. But after the auction they just gave me this painted wooden panel with the emptiness around. What a trick!". According to the fans of fakes, during the conversation with them the interviewee was desperately searching the net frame of suitable kind and size for your new purchase over half a billion.

Left: "Salvator Mundi" in a frame. Photograph: Christie’s