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Paul Delvaux Belgium 1897-1994
1897−1994
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Biography and information
 
Delvaux Paul (1897−1994), Belgian surrealist painter.
Born September 23, 1897 in Anteite (province of Liege, Belgium). He studied at the Royal Academy of Arts in Brussels. In 1920−1924, Delvaux was influenced by Giorgio de Chirico and de Smet, a Flemish expressionist with his special concept of naked body and an atmosphere of silence and restraint.
Artist Paul Delvaux came to surrealism after his impressionistic and expressionist experiences and became especially popular in fashion art circles after World War II, when surrealism was at its zenith. In 1939, Delvaux visited Italy, the architecture of ancient Rome made a deep impression on him.
Surrealist artist Paul Delvaux is known for his ghostly images of beautiful, often naked girls, usually located against the backdrop of meticulously painted buildings.
Delvaux paintings are represented in the museums of Belgium, as well as in the Metropolitan Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, in London (Tate Gallery), in Paris (Museum of Modern Art, Georges Pompidou Center). In 1978, a foundation was established for the establishment of the Paul Delvaux personal museum, which opened in 1982 in Saint-Idesbald (West Flanders province). In 1950−1962, Delvaux served as a professor at the Brussels Academy of Arts.
Delvaux died in Verne on July 20, 1994.


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    leonid legeev
    added artworks
    Paul Delvaux Belgium 1897-1994. Nude and mannequin. 1947 Private collection
    Paul Delvaux Belgium 1897-1994. Landscape with lanterns. 1958 Albertina Gallery, Vienna
    Paul Delvaux Belgium 1897-1994. Gentle night. 1960
    Gentle night. 1960
    Paul Delvaux Belgium 1897-1994
    1960-1960, 29.5×19.2 cm
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    Artworks by the artist
    22 artworks total
    129.8×149.5 cm
    23.5×32 cm
    73×54.5 cm
    64.5×47.6 cm
    110×170 cm
    63.5×51 cm
    63.6×51.1 cm
    View 22 artworks by the artist